Library / About the Library / Exhibitions

Exhibitions

The Library hosts a variety of exhibitions, which showcase the Library’s resources and archival collections. Unless otherwise stated, exhibitions are open to the public and admission is free.

Current exhibitions

The Sydney Ball Gift

In 2013 the University of South Australia accepted a major gift from the acclaimed Australian artist Sydney Ball.  This prestigious gift, comprising over thirty important works and worth more than one million dollars, is by far the most valuable gift of Australian art ever made to the University.  The installation of the Sydney Ball Gift in the Sir Eric Neal Library at Mawson Lakes celebrates the artist’s long and impressive career and considerable impact on Australian art, and recognises this wonderful act of generosity to the University. 

Sydney Ball Gift

The University of South Australia Art Collection: The Sydney Ball Gift. Photographs by Alex Kwong, courtesy Samstag Museum of Art

Sydney Ball Gift 2
The University of South Australia Art Collection: The Sydney Ball Gift. Photograph by Jane Whiteside.

Sydney Ball Gift 3

The University of South Australia Art Collection: The Sydney Ball Gift. Photographs by Alex Kwong, courtesy Samstag Museum of Art

On Wednesday February 18th 2015 The Sydney Ball Gift was officially launched by Professor David Lloyd Vice Chancellor and President of the University of South Australia in the presence of the artist.

 

2014 exhibitions

Cultivating Modernism

The Library proudly supported the Cultivating Modernism exhibition with Richard Aitken which was hosted by the Kerry Packer Civic Gallery from Monday 17 February - Monday 31 March 2014.

Cultivating Modernism was an inspiration to all with an interest in gardens, books, and the recent past.

Exploring modernism from the perspective of the Australian garden, author and curator Richard Aitken charted garden making from World War I until the dawn of environmentalism in the 1960s and 1970s. His lecture showcased garden design during a turbulent period from pre-war European functionalism to a more relaxed post-war Californian modernism, showing how the garden was a necessary prop for modernism's reality.