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Copyright

Sharing Your Work

Think carefully about what reuses of your work you would like to encourage.

  • Many people mistakenly believe that if there is no copyright statement, they can do whatever they want with your work. Including contact information and instructions for seeking permission with your work makes it clear to others when permission is required and who to contact for permission.

If there are certain uses you are not okay with others making of your work, think carefully about how you share.

  • You might consider adding a watermark to identify your work or if your work is in digital format, uploading a low resolution image of your work to the web. In either case, make sure to include contact information with your work so that someone wanting to re-use your work can contact you either for a non-watermarked copy or to request a high resolution copy.
  • If you want to prevent people from re-using your work without your permission, you might consider applying a Technological Protection Measure (TPM). TPMs are commonly used on digital music, movies, computer software and games. However, be sure to include contact information with your work so that someone wanting to re-use your work can contact you.

If there are certain uses you are okay with others making of your work, consider sharing in a way that will promote or permit those uses.

  • Making your work available under an open licence is one way to proactively let others know what uses are permitted beyond those normally allowed under copyright law.
  • Offering your work under a Creative Commons licence does not mean giving up your copyright. It means permitting users to make use of your material in various ways, but only on certain conditions.

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