Cultural Advice

Aboriginal Peoples are advised the Library Collection contains images, voices and names of deceased people in physical and online resources.

The Library recognises the significance of the traditional cultural knowledges contained within its Collection. The Library acknowledge some materials contain language that may not reflect current attitudes, was published without consent or recognition, or, is offensive. These materials reflect the views of the authors and/or the period in which they were produced and do not represent the views of the Library.

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Learn more about the Voice to Parliament

This weekend, Saturday 14th October is the Voice Referendum where Australians have a chance to take action and make a change.

According to the Australian Government “A Voice to Parliament would be a permanent body to make representations to the Australian Parliament and the Executive Government on legislation and policy of significance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It would further the self-determination of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, by giving them a greater say on matters that affect them.”

The Voice will be made up of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from all states and territories, be gender balanced and include youth. A Voice to Parliament will not have veto powers but instead allows for direct communication between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the Government which will be enshrined in the constitution.

Take a moment to listen to Noel Pearson on why a Yes vote would be a ‘great day’ for multicultural communities:

Learn more about the Voice to Parliament

Watch this short video The Indigenous Voice to Parliament – separating fact from fiction | 7.30

Remember when discussing the Voice and voting this weekend it is crucial that any conversation is done respectfully and does not cause harm to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Information about how to minimise harm in conversations about the referendum can be found on the Australian Human Rights Commission website.